• Kyle Dickson

Documents Needed When Creating or Updating Your Will


Whether you’re having a first Will drafted or updating an older one, you can help speed up the process by bringing copies of specific documents to your appointment. If possible, try to bring copies that you can leave behind for an extended period of time.

It’s also useful if you can readily explain the special circumstances involved with any beneficiaries you’ll be naming in your Will. For example, be sure to tell us if someone is still a minor, has a major disability – or may be difficult to contact due to unique job or living arrangements. Finally, keep in mind that all major life events can require future Will updates.


We hope the information we’ve shared below will help you locate the documents we’ll need when first meeting with you regarding your current estate planning needs. Many assets may be transferred either by contract or under a Will, so letting us know of any existing contractual beneficiaries aids in your overall estate planning. Our goal is to create a comprehensive estate plan that allows you to provide testamentary gifts to all of your chosen beneficiaries.


Documents/Information That Helps Attorneys Analyze Your Assets & Desired Gifts

  • A thorough list of all real property you own/co-own (or are currently purchasing). We will need copies of all property deeds that state your ownership rights – and all related mortgage documents.

  • Copies of your most recent checking and savings account statements, together with any designation of beneficiaries.

  • A list of all automobiles you own – including all other motorized vehicles titled in your name (and information stating how much you owe on each one of them).

  • Copies of all personal life insurance policies, together with any designation of beneficiaries.

  • Documents describing all structured settlements that name you as a beneficiary.

  • Your most recent certificate of deposit and brokerage firm statements, together with any designation of beneficiaries.

  • Copies of your most current 401(k), IRA, Roth, Keogh, pension, or other retirement account statements, together with any designation of beneficiaries.

  • A comprehensive list of all monthly rents and other payments owed to you personally – or to your business.

  • A complete list of all of your current stocks and bonds, together with any designation of beneficiaries.

  • A comprehensive list of all of your most valuable personal property, including: jewelry, artwork, household furniture, antiques, and other similar possessions.

  • A thorough list of all outstanding credit card debts owing – as well as any other lines of credit you’re trying to pay off.

  • Documents indicating any type of monthly support or inheritance you currently receive. This might include spousal support payments or trust account payments. You may also want to tell us about any testamentary gifts you expect to receive in the near future.

  • Any important information concerning your pets, such as veterinarian, special diet, person to care for your pets.

  • A list of any other major assets (or debts) that you haven’t already named above. Also, please be prepared to tell us about any bankruptcy filings you’ve made – either business or personal ones – during the past 10 years. Be sure to bring copies of any paperwork documenting those filings.

Information to Designate Persons to Carry Out Your Wishes

  • Full legal names, birthdates, addresses and phone numbers for:

  • Executor and two alternates;

  • Trustee and two alternates;

  • Guardian and two alternates;

  • Medical Power of Attorney and two alternates;

  • Financial Power of Attorney and two alternates;

  • Medical Provider.

Common Circumstances that Can Trigger the Immediate Need to Update Your Will

  • You get married – or divorced.

  • You adopt a child or have one born to you or your spouse/partner.

  • When one or more of your beneficiaries pass away. Depending upon the type of gifts you left to these individuals – and how they were structured – you may or may not need to update your Will. Please always call and check with us upon such deaths.

  • You gain or lose a business partner – please contact us so we can be sure your Will fully protects all of your rights regarding this type of change. Likewise, please get in touch if you change the legal structure of your business enterprise – e.g., you change it from a solo-proprietorship to a partnership – or corporation.

  • A family member’s health has significantly declined. Also, please be sure to tell us if a beneficiary has started receiving social security disability payments so we can properly structure all gifts or funds you’re providing to this individual. If you fail to do this, it can threaten this person’s ongoing eligibility to receive such government payments.

  • Whenever you purchase or inherit a new home, new land, or other real estate.

  • You significantly add to – or diminish – the number of insurance policies you’re keeping current.

  • When you personally become seriously ill. This will let us check to be sure your current medical insurance and insurance policies will fully cover all of your needs.

  • Please let us know when you’ve changed your legal home or business residence. There may be new tax consequences that should be reviewed. Likewise, let us know if you decide to change the nature of your current citizenship.

  • You inherit a very large sum of money. Likewise, please inform us if you’d like to start giving large sums of money to one or more charities.

  • One of your current beneficiaries can no longer manage his or her financial affairs. This can occur due to general physical or mental health issues – as well as due to various accidents or addictions.

  • There are major changes in your earnings or investments. This will allow us to properly adjust the size and types of gifts you may want to give to different individuals.

  • You hear about major state or federal tax changes that could affect your estate. Rest assured, we normally contact all of our clients under such circumstances. However, we’re always here to answer any questions you may have.

While the information shared above is fairly comprehensive, we believe it’s important for our clients to fully understand all aspects of the estate planning process. In light of that goal, we’ll now also note some of the unusual events that can prevent a named beneficiary from receiving your designated gifts. If you’ll stay in close contact with us, we can usually prevent this from occurring.


Reasons a Named Beneficiary May Not Receive All Indicated Gifts

  • We cannot locate a beneficiary. Of course, your executor has a legal and fiduciary duty to hire all necessary personnel to locate all named beneficiaries. It’s always a good idea to provide our office with any new addresses for your beneficiaries, especially when they move out of the country.

  • A later divorce takes place. In an effort to protect testators who forget to update their wills after divorcing, many states have passed laws that prevent former spouses from receiving property the testators would not have wanted to give them had they updated their Wills. Of course, it’s always best to immediately contact us whenever you divorce or remarry.

  • A gift has abated. When you pass away, your estate may not be large enough to cover all of your taxes and expenses. In some cases, we may still be able to provide some gifts on a pro-rated basis, in keeping with the terms of your Will.

  • Your Will conflicts with the legal requirements of a governing community property state (like Texas) in which you live. This is one of the reasons why it’s always wise to allow our firm to carefully review any Will you already have that was drafted by another estate planning attorney. While such errors are rare, they can invalidate all or part of your Will – if it fails to honor the division of marital property required by this (or another) community property state.

  • A court later declares your Will to be void for legal reasons. This is extremely rare and would usually only occur if certain types of fraud (or mistakes) were involved.

  • A gift causa mortis has been made. While this is rare, it simply means that if a person’s death is imminent – and he/she makes a specific gift to someone (often a person right there in his/her presence), the prior named beneficiary may not receive it. Courts will naturally need to investigate this type of situation to be sure undue influence wasn’t involved or any type of fraud.


We hope this general overview of information has proved useful. However, please know that our attorneys are always available to answer any questions you may have concerning your estate planning needs.

© 2020 MURRAY-LOBB PLLC

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